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20121205
20121213
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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
than expected. >> every month we waste makes protecting the environment more expensive and increases the problems for the people whose lives have already been adversely affected. we have no time to lose. >> even germany, considered a leader on environmental protection, has come under criticism. the mayan minister could not live up to his promise. environmental groups say it is largely down to chancellor angela merkel. >> merkel has not use her voice strongly enough, and that is why the situation in the eu is so critical. it is lacking a leader, and effects are being felt everywhere. >> climate experts warn that if emissions do not sink in the coming years, the consequences will be dire. a new climate treaty is due before 2020, but after events in doha, that is looking more unlikely than ever. >> as we saw in that report, the german environment minister is playing a key role in the climate talks. we asked if he thought there would be a breakthrough. >> first of all, we are in the middle of a very, very important and difficult negotiation process. i expect negotiations going on all day
, signs that drove him to do more to help the environment. >> giving the blessings to the people and healing that is not enough. i have to do more. the whole world is suffering from this climate crisis. >> he always carries holy water with him. he says it has stress-relieving properties, and that could be needed here. negotiators have come from all over the world. u.n. secretary general ban ki- moon is also here to push the talks forward. delegates were shown a bleak video portraying the terrible effects of climate change. few expect any breakthroughs here. instead, environmental groups put on a sarcastic performance, handing an award to the biggest contributors per-capita to climate change, new zealand, canada, and the u.s. 1 lebanese activist is one of the demonstrators. in his home country, climate protection is a side issue. conflict in the middle east and the civil war in syria take up the headlines. he wants to change that. >> if we take down a dictatorship to establish a democracy and i do not have a plan to live on, what shall i do with democracy? -- have a planet to live
up. in today'g environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management . >> clayton: i6789 >> predictions. >> making me want to drink, i doubt i'm alone. >> and brown foreman. >> bull or bear on jack. >> i'm bearish. >> brenda: your prediction. >> i like mattel, i think it's going to have a great christmas and i own the stock by the way, i think all-time high in february of next year. >> brenda: toby, bull or bear. >> coal in your stocking. >> brenda: what do you like, toby. >> it benefits from them, i like them
donald payne to require firsthand knowledge of how the workplace works and the environment in which those miners go to work every day. in the classroom, lynn woolsey continues to fight for women and working families. she was -- i want to say harsh, but i will say tough advocate. making sure that women were represented in the stem fields and the careers and women and young women had access to the sciences and to technology and to math and engineering. lynn woolsey worked to ensure kids had access at every education -- every education opportunity and a well-rounded curriculum to meet their social and emotional needs. american families have benefited from lynn woolsey's fierced a vow casey. harsh, spirited. that's our advocate, lynn. i will miss here contributions on the education committee for the years to come. she's fought tirelessly to protect the environment. most especially in the sonoma coast of san francisco bay and hopefully the president will follow her lead and designate further protections of our ocean and marine habitat in that area of our precious coast. i am very grateful for
in an environment in the construction business where it's a right-to-work state, and we had tremendous booms in construction with that kind of scenario. it does work, but then, you know, look at new york where it's a predominant union town and union state, and, you know, look, things get done efficiently, but it costs more money to bill union, versus nonunion, and the question you have to ask is does it impact on generates more or less jobs? neil: but do you think that the president should make a statement? no one denies that unions helped em over the finish line, passionate crowds feeled owed, and the president feels an obligatn to pay them back here, but should he make a statement, as businessmen argued, to stand and say this is one thing i'm just not with you on. i see nothing wrong with free choices. >> i think the president should speak what he think is the right way to do things, speak from his heart, speak, you know, from what his beliefs are. you know, the president, you know, the office, itsel is an office of leadership. the president's a leader, and he should articulate what his vi
an environment in which we can care for the elderly. >> the think americans will remain optimistic but this did of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with t
are in a very good environment. and in north america, obviously, is important. europe is obviously important. but you're focusing on emerging markets. >> yes. >> even putting manufacturing, which i'm not sure, why would you build -- you're building a $100 million plant in africa. why not just export to avenue from from other places? why build a plant in africa? >> we have going to affect the organization from here. this was a unique opportunity because it was a state-owned factory. we managed to take over and they needed technology. and why produce there is a huge market. there are 1 billion people right now, the population will double. >> on the continent? >> yeah. on the continent of africa. they have a problem with feud security now. they have 60% of the global reserves of tillable land, which is great news, and only 20% of this land are used today, are farms today. therefore, it is a very interesting market. i'm very proud that we discovered it first and that we will be there also the first to manufacture from the western global players. >> so private corporation. who needs to go into th
. >> except that if we go over the cliff and given how tenuous this economic environment is right now, i mean, the message that sends to business leaders, employers, let alone the american people, is this place is not only ungovernable, it is dysfunction beyond dysfunction. >> a friend of mine, a wealthy california guy, a liberal, said, if you think they're going to trust you after you miss the january 1st deadline, they'll be no trust. they'll say, if you can't meet your own deadline, why would you meet anybody else's. >> and the markets, whether it's europe or american, are pricing in a solution. you see it really quite clearly. >> somebody was on -- mcmahon yesterday was wrong, they're not pricing a failure, they're pricing in a solution. thank you, chris kofinis, for that report from greece. jared bernstein, as always, thank you. >>> when we return, let me finish with the ghost of fiscal cliff yet to come. wait until you see this story. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? y
at starbucks. people are desperate to find something new to buy. >> and in an environment of rising employment, that's a big deal for mcdonald's especially in the breakfast business which is a high margin business. it is highly leveraged to macro indicators too. >> when i go there, there's a promotion going on that didn't bring me into the store. i want to be brought into a store because of a promotion and not discover, wow, i paid much less than i thought. >> i told you about mcbites. will you go into the store now? >> i think they are called mccorn balls now. we changed the name. >> melissa is up to date on the menu. >> yesterday it was mcrib. >> these are very important to the stories of these fast food chains. that's why i'm so -- >> what's the calorie count? when you see the calorie count that's the determinant. can i have three lipitor. >> that's what i'm on right now. >> are you really? where is your bad cholesterol? >> it's not good. not good. >> mine is 80. >> goody for you. that's what happens when you get old. you compare cholesterol levels. >> i went to trader joe's last night. tur
as their environment, or industrial transportation, heating ventilation. so you've got a security company and what we consider to be the core of this, in many ways. significant buyback of shares, and pay dividends. but they're not moving it up, they're paying it in march. >> a new ceo comes in, listed the pelts. why should you buy anything with the pelts involved. this is work for "mad money," after pelts provided it. after. you're up 11%. in other words, you don't know before it. versus the s&p being up 4%. this goes back to 2005. he's been just a terrific guy to invest with, as, by the way, everybody tells me he's a terrific guy. >> he is a nice guy. his activism, he sort of moved it to the performance side of things, and the operational side. it was started many ways by hines, which was a nasty fight, now he's on the board. he and johnson are buddy buddy. >> johnson told me he felt pelts' idea after initial resistance, that pelts said his ideas were great. >> best buy, one of the big losers this morning. you point out merrill has a note telling a lot of people what they probably already know, fina
a connection. >> eric: here is how you make a connection. business environment in state of michigan, city of detroit is terrible. companies aren't coming in there investing. >> dana: a few years ago governor rick schneider took over, a businessman. he had done get awa get gateways and he didn't have to do anything else but decided to serve the state. to the point was dire. some said the governor, state of michigan would need to take over the city of detroit. you can separate the issues. bail-out idea, bail-out detroit versus what governor rick snyder is doing, fundamental change for michigan to make it more like a state like virginia. 23 other states that are right to work states. if they compete for work they got, and the idea might be better. it could be good for state of michigan, if painful for a few people for a while. >> eric: so many car companies say we like to do business in america. freddie addressing the fiscal cliff in detroit is going to mercury to address global warming. it's hot there. only obama could declare the auto bail-out a success. that is like hurricane sandy is a m
if you go over the cliff and given how tenuous this economic environment is right now, the message it sends to business leaders, employers, this place is not only ungovern ner rabl, it's dysfunction among dysfunction. >> freand of mine, a liberal, said if you think they are going to trust you after you my the january 1st deadline, do you think they will trust you that week? if you can't meet your own deadline, why should they make anybody else's? >> and the markets are pricing in a solution. you see it really quite clearly. >> and somebody was on -- mcmahon was wrong. there are grownups jared bernsteinรง and chris, thank yo. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. if you're a man with low testosterone, you should know
left, let's talk about the current environment. what are you hearing from a lot of the senior executives that are asking for your advice or if you're in a board room or chatting with them especially in terms of the fiscal cliff and concern about making big decisions or lack thereof and not putting money at it. >> the interesting part is talk about the fiscal cliff is the talk about the talk about the fiscal cliff. i don't think people are as concerned as the level of chatter that goes around. i think the chatter is more than the concern. the fiscal cliff just happens to be a preset deal on a scale of one to ten. it's a deal that is possible as outcome. i think what the country should hope for is that we come up with a better deal. business wants the rules. i understand why business is very much do a deal. do a something. because a business then can make their plans around that. if a marginal tax rate goes up too high here, they'll put a plant somewhere else. you can make those decisions. they want to know the rules. >> know the rules of the road. >> there's an america out ther
are smith travel, if you look at those numbers, it's a very positive environment. the fiscal cliff will affect people when employment gets affected. this is a real issue. if you see something occurring with employment, we're sensitive, we're monitoring, we represent the folks that are going to be most affected if they don't do their job in washington. we're obviously concerned about it. if they deal with it, which we think they will. we think that next year should be pretty positive. >> meanwhile big party tonight? >> big party tonight, big party last night. >> that's what the city's all about. >> we'll be opening white plains in may, it will be a little warmer than it was up there last night. it's very exciting to see those hotels get done. 1,000 jobs for the city. >> you see at the bottom of your screen, nat gas inventory. >> listen natural gas prices are extending their gains from yet, after that 4% rally that we saw. we're looking at resistance perhaps around the 4.75 level. we saw a natural gas level that was certainly not what analysts were expectings. 65 billion cubic feet w
that as a preference, i could not have. but to hear people talk about them, going into an environment like that, i white say that i actually like it. -- i might say that i actually like it and that is still a huge part of the american television experience that gets sold short by talking about anytime, anywhere now. there is a certain amount of escapism and passivity in roaming around the television jungle, finding things that you did not know were there. >> michael powell on the future of television, tonight on c-span 2. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are continuing our series, looking at different parts of the fiscal cliff talks. joining us now is robert levenson, a senior defense analyst at bloomberg government. let's begin with what secret -- with what sequestration means. caller -- guest: it is a funny term. if you have looked it up on google 20 months ago, it would have something to do with coal and carbon, but this is about automatic cuts going into place known as sequestration. host: how did this come about? where is it headed? caller: as we recall from last year, there was a
and let me go into an environment and go kind of gambling around in that and suddenly find, you know what, i sort of like it and i'm watching it. i still think that is a huge park of the american television experience, and i think it gets sold short when you get techno ecstatic talking about anytime, anywhere. i do still think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escapism and passivity and being able to just kind of rumor around the tv jungle of finding the things that they did not know were there. >> michael powell and the future of television to 98:00 eastern on "the communicators" on c-span2. >> a forum on the iranian nuclear program. part of an event recently hosted by the foundation for defense of democracy here in washington d.c. this is just over 40 minutes. >> great. thanks very much, david. thank you to all of you. thank you, senator casey. grateful for your remarks and service. we are going to do a topic that is going to sound technical, non-proliferation policy in the wake of the arab spring, but i want to put this to some human terms. this is the sum of all of your panel.
business environment possible, create more and better jobs, and to make government smaller, smarter, and more efficient. we did things like that, agency consolidation, it consolidation, some of those common sense approaches that you would do more often that we do not see. those are things that are saving us millions of dollars. our it consolidations are estimated to save $100 million over the course of the term and potentially next term. we also, in the same situation, have $2 in our rainy day fund. it is really thinking about how we do things smarter, more efficiently, and using the technology and resources we have to make things more efficient and cost-effective for government. we reduced by $5 billion by passing a law that says we could not pass what was not funded. ours was not challenged in court, fortunately. we are looking at more pension reform. we have seven pension systems in the state. they are operated by different pension boards that have different rules, different structures, looking at the potential of having them under one board that monitors all of the pensions so y
'll get. >> you know what, i think the environment, as you look out to next year, is really difficult, ross. i mean, you don't really know what is going to come out of the u.s. fiscal cliff, how damaging potentially that can be to u.s. confidence, u.s. activity. things seem to be holding up fairly well in china. but i think there is still going to be some concerns about the whole performance of the asian economy and whether that can actually pick up next year. and then, of course, in the eurozone itself, we seem to be mending the problems progressively and taking out the tail risks, which i think is good and that is the bottom line that investors should take going further forward, but at the same time, there are some elements that you can have. if you do a forecast, in a way you could come up with something like 1% quotes for next year, but at the same time, you have to be conscious that we've had such a battery of downside impact, downside negative news coming through really for all economists in the western world in the last few years. you have to be very cognizant of those. >> i th
for a very good purpose to protect workers in an environment where they really had no means to protect themselves. that dynamic man many would say has changed dramatically over the years and the unions are struggling to hang onto their existence in many ways. >> the unions give them very fragmentary information on how they spend their dues money. about 7 5:00, 80% of it goes to politics electing people who will then turn around and give them pay raises if they work, for example in the public sector. bottom line, unions, i think should represent workers for collective bargaining, grievances, all kinds of issues, but if you are paying politics the worker should have a right, when 40% of workers generally vote republican if they are a union, they should have a right to say my dues go to what i want not the politicians you want as union bosses. martha: how do you think this stakes out in michigan. >> in wisconsin there was a lot of protesting, it went on for a longtime, there were recall attempts, ultimately the public backed the governor and the governor is pretty popular in michigan beca
and where to spend it, as they look at the u.s., what they want to see is a stable environment to put that money to work. if we can get that capital into the u.s. that will be a stimulus program by itself. >> frits, we pending on how you look at the numbers there are peel who say these two proposals aren't that far off. if you look at the numbers on each side and maybe try to find some common ground in the middle, maybe get to $1.2 trillion, where do you go on spending cuts is the big question because that seems to be a little easier. do you think this needs to be a three to one when it comes to revenue versus revenue increase or three to one when it comes to spending cuts versus revenue increases? do you see one to one, what would make you feel good looking around the globe and looking at what -- >> i'm not a tax expert so i can't give you a precise ratio. what we need to do is see a program where, if you look at reasonable numbers, you could see that the debt-to-gdp ratio comes down over time. as we go from $16 trillion, as we cross that 100% mark, we start looking more and more lik
american corporations have done a terrific job of coping with a tough regulatory environment, a tough financial. the aftermath of this financial crisis. a lot of negative publicity. and made a lot of money. >> we want to rise above. do we not have a debt ceiling right after that? >> the debt ceiling. the interesting question whether they're going to roll -- >> here's what i think. we haven't talked about this. so i say president obama allows us to go over the cliff temporarily so that all the rates go up. then the democrats introduce a bill to lower it for 9 %, do some other stiff -- 98%, do some other stuff they want to do. then the republicans say fine but we've got to hold the debt ceiling, that's the next bargaining chip. i don't think we can use rides above for the debt ceiling because we don't want to rise above the debt ceiling. we have to come one new buttons -- >> pins, the whole thing. yeah. that is a dilemma. what a polemic -- >> constantino is cutting me off. you're going to hold that against me? all right. >> you can hear the voice in my head. >> yeah. he's mad because i
it comes to young people from the most disadvantaged and troubled environments. there is so much to talk about. in an area we have been talking about on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-ter
. >> is it possible to ever get back to that in this environment? >> it is. you have a lot of problems with the piece. >> do you briyou believe if you rote deficit -- two different ways. you either keep the government that you have and pay for it by raising taxes, or you kind of leave taxes where they are and you shrink government down to where it pays for it. does it matter for the future and for growth which way you do it in your view? >> it does. if you put it all into like a tightening, so how much tightening occurs in the economy that would slow the economy, it's far better to actually reduce government spending than it is to actually raise taxes. >> although that hurts the economy, too. >> everything hurts the economy. so it's a question of which is most -- or least harmful and that tends to be cutting government spending. >> but i do think it's -- >> although tim geithner would disagree with me. >> one side wants to keep the government and entitlements like we have it. and the other side wants to take away all the excess government -- >> i think both sides agree that you need to do both. just
pricing environment, and low interest rates. so collectively, we think these three factors would definitely drive demand verystantially next year. it's been a terrific year for the home builders. we think we're still in the third inning, not the seventh inning. both for fundamentals and the stocks. >> is there a part of the market we'll see the most building? is it the lower end or higher end? take a look at the demographic patterns, household formations depressed since 2007. there's a notion there has to be a catch-up and new households now being formed. if you're to take that piece as going forward, you would think it would be the younger end of the spectrum out there going out there -- >> absolutely. we're comfortable with the thesis that first time home buyers are going back to the market in a very strong way. we see a number of stocks doing really well who cater to that market next year, like lennar, hulte, tull will do well and our big cause of the sandskaps will show strength. arizona, california, nevada and florida. it's going to take us out. >> the concern investors migh
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)